— Bibliographic Items

Italian Jewish Musical Traditions from the Leo Levi Collection (1954-1961)

Title:
Italian Jewish Musical Traditions from the Leo Levi Collection (1954-1961)
20
Collector
Publisher: 
Jewish Music Research Centre and the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, Roma
Material Type: 
Recordings
Tradition: 
Italian
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem, Rome
Year: 
2001
Place of Recording: 
Rome
Edition: 
1
Series: 
Anthology of Music Traditions in Israel
Volume: 
14
Pages: 
1 CD + booklet
Recording Number: 
AMTI CD 0102
Type of Recording: 
Research Recording
Media: 
CD
Languages: 
English
Greek
Country / Area: 
Italy
Description: 

1 CD, accompanied by Hebrew and English program notes and texts. Selections of liturgical music of various Jewish communities in Italy, recorded originally by the Italian Jewish ethnomusicologist Leo Levi (1912-1982) from original sources. Contents: prayers, cantillation and hymns for Sabbath, High holidays, festivals, Hannukah, Purim; Songs and hymns for Birth, circumcision and wedding.

You can listen to the album on Spotify

 

Maoz Tzur

The track opens with the blessing recited upon lighting the Hanukkah candles followed by the hymn commemorating the reestablishment of Jewish worship in the Jerusalem Temple by the Maccabeans. The 'Ma'oz tzur' melody from the Verona Ashkenazi ritual is a variant of the tune transcribed by Benedetto Marcello. Other variants collected by Levi in Ferrara Gorizia Casale Monferrato and Turin attest to its longevity among the Italian Ashkenazi communities and its popularity among Italian communities in Piedmont.

Betzet Israel

This Melody for Psalm 114 celebrating the Exodus is a revealing example of the "Pan-Italian repertoire." Sung during the Passover services in the Italian rites of Ferrara (as documented here) and Rome it also appears in the Sephardi repertoires of Livorno and Venice as a "melodic marker" of this holiday.

Lekha Dodi (Turin)

Hymn by Shelomo Alkabetz (c. 1505-1584) for the "Welcoming the Sabbath" before the Friday Evening Service. This Torinese version is still sung today with the congeration repeating the second part of each stanza as a refrain.

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