Modes

Cross-Repertoire Motifs in Liturgical Music of the Ashkenazi Tradition: An Initial Lay of the Land

Author

The earlier version, entitled “Cross-Repertoire Motifs in the Liturgical Music of Ashkenazi Tradition,” was presented at the World Congress of Jewish Studies, Jerusalem, 2013.  This article is an expanded and elaborated version of that paper.

Material Type: 
Articles
Year: 
2015

The Concept of Mode in European Synagogue Chant

The article deals with research of the "Adonai Malach" Steiger using 30 melodies representing an existing tradition. "Adonai Malach"'s scale, motives, the motives' function, placement and the Steiger's "ethos" are all examined. The Steiger proves to be an extraordinary phenomenon in European music but there is an obvious similarity to the melodic structure of Eastern music in the past and present.

Material Type: 
Articles in Books
Year: 
1971

Deux textes arabes inedits sur la musique

This article translates and explains two manuscripts originally in Arabic written in Hebrew letters one of which originates from Iraq in the late 10th century. They discusses different aspects of music, list melodic and rhythmic modes and discuss Pythagorean and NeoPythagorean ideas about music.

Material Type: 
Articles in Books
Year: 
1968

The Mogen Ovos Mode: a Study in Folklore

Singing the prayer magen avot, the abbreviated repetition of Sabbath-eve amidah, is an old tradition which "goes back to the third century." Jewish communities in different parts of the world share the same mode for the prayer, though each community has its own variant. This mode, which, to Idelsohn, is the deepest expression of the Jewish soul, is based on an "original melodic line of Jewish folk song" and is also the foundation of various synagogue melodies (e.g. Leoni's yigdal).

Material Type: 
Articles in Journals

Parallels Between the Old–French and the Jewish Song

A somewhat controversial article in which Idelsohn tries to show traces of Jewish music in French folk music. Jews settled in France in the fourth century; "they were scattered throughout the country and lived mingled with the native people" until the fourteenth century when they were expelled twice, first in 1306 and for the second time in 1394.

Material Type: 
Articles in Journals
Year: 
1933

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