Liturgy

Zimrat Yah, vols. 1 & 2

Author

Liturgic songs consisting of Hebrew, German and English arranged for the Jewish rite with organ accompaniment. Vol. I. comprising the Sabbath Evening and Morning Services, Psalms and Hymns. Vol. II comprising the Services, Psalms and Hymns for the three Festivals, Thanksgiving, Purim and Chanukah.

Material Type: 
Books
Year: 
1871-1886

The practice of music as an expression of religious philosophy among the East-Ashkenazi Jews

Special issue on Jewish music Establishing a conceptual framework for the discussion of the liturgical music of the East Ashkenazi Jews cannot apply the commonly accepted notions of prayer, speech, sacred, music, and art as separate categories.

Material Type: 
Articles in Journals
Year: 
2000

The mystical strain in Jewish liturgical music

Drawing on evidence from the Ashkenazic, Sephardic, and Yemenite traditions, and generally relying on 19th and 20th-c. notation, the author considers the identifiable contributions of mystics and elements that actually grew out of mystical theory. Both the logogenic style (the Rabbinic, intellectual, and didactic strain) and the pathogenic style (the mystical strain) are present in the music of the Jewish liturgy. Cited texts include those by a 7th-c.

Material Type: 
Articles in Journals
Year: 
1983

Medieval Elements in the Liturgical Music of the Jews of Southern France and Northern Spain

Refutes the theory held by Idelsohn and others that Sephardic music reflected solely Arabic influence, and posits that, from the mid-12th c. to the end of the 15th c., the center of gravity of Iberian Jewish culture moved northward to Christian Spain and Provence. The burgeoning musical culture of that region must have affected the music of the Jews there, just as the synagogue song of the German Jews was influenced by the secular song and Christian chant of northern Europe.

Material Type: 
Articles in Journals
Year: 
1975-6

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