Holocaust

Music Publishing and Patronage: C. F. Peters, 1800 to the Holocaust.

Retrieved from: The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum: Research: Bibliographies History of C. F. Peters, one of the oldest and largest music publishing houses in the world. Includes chapters covering the implications of Nazi racial and cultural policies on the German music publishing industry in general and the company itself, which was taken over, or “aryanized,” by the Nazis after Kristallnacht.

Material Type: 
Books
Year: 
2000

The Twisted Muse: Musicians and Their Music in the Third Reich

Retrieved from: The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum: Research: Bibliographies Illustrates the effect of Nazi policies on German musical culture by exploring the lives of musicians in the Third Reich, from little-known musicians in local orchestras to major composers and performers. Reviews the use of music as a propaganda tool in schools and civic organizations. Includes extensive endnotes and an index.

Material Type: 
Books
Year: 
1997

Music and Nazism: Art under Tyranny, 1933-1945

Retrieved from: The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum: Research: Bibliographies Collection of essays mapping the landscape of musical culture in Nazi Germany. Explores the ideological underpinnings of the Nazi approach to music and the implications of these ideas on musicians in the Third Reich. Includes endnotes for each essay, biographical entries for all contributors, and an index.

Material Type: 
Books
Year: 
2003

The Inextinguishable Symphony: A True Story of Music and Love in Nazi Germany

Retrieved from: The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum: Research: Bibliographies Tells the story of the author’s parents, who met as performers in the Jewish Culture Association ("Jdische Kulturbund") orchestra in Frankfurt. Describes the activities of the Kulturbund in the face of rising Nazi antagonism throughout the 1930s, and the decision by the author’s father to return from Sweden to Germany in 1936 to be with the woman who would later be his wife.

Material Type: 
Books
Year: 
2000

The Destruction of a Cultural Tradition in Germany: Organs and Organ Music in the Synagogue

Retrieved from: The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum: Research: Bibliographies Describes the fate of Jewish organists and organ music under the Nazis, culminating in the destruction of over 200 synagogue organs on Kristallnacht. Includes brief obituaries for 22 organists and composers who died in the Holocaust.

Material Type: 
Articles in Books
Year: 
2001

TheTarget of Racial Purity: The ‘Degenerate Music’ Exhibition in Dsseldorf, 1938

Retrieved from: The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum: Research: Bibliographies Presents an overview of the history of German music from the end of World War I through the rise of Nazism, culminating in the “degenerate music” exhibit of 1938.

Material Type: 
Articles in Books
Year: 
2002

Driven into Paradise: The Musical Migration from Nazi Germany to the United States

Retrieved from: The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum: Research: Bibliographies Essays chronicling the experiences of musicians forced to leave Nazi Germany for racial, political, or professional reasons. Presents case studies of well-known performers and composers who attempted to their musical careers in the United States. Includes an appendix listing musicologists who fled Europe in the 1930s and 1940s.

Material Type: 
Books
Year: 
1999

Propaganda Swing

Co-author

Retrieved from: The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum: Research: Bibliographies Describes the use of music broadcasts and recordings as propaganda tools in the Third Reich. Traces the history of Charlie and His Orchestra, a swing group formed by the Nazi propaganda ministry to influence the general public in England and the United States. Includes a CD of propaganda broadcasts and music.

Material Type: 
Articles in Books
Year: 
1997

Hosanna or ‘Hilk, O Herr Uns’: National Identity, the German Christian Movement, and the ‘Dejudaization’ of Sacred Music in the Third Reich

Retrieved from: The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum: Research: Bibliographies Outlines the efforts of government officials to “Germanize” and “dejudaize” the texts of sacred choral works, such as Christmas carols and traditional hymns, by modifying the verses to reflect Nazi ideals. Includes a suggested reading list on the subject.

Material Type: 
Articles in Books
Year: 
2002

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