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Title:
Yuval - Studies of the Jewish Music Research Center, vol. 7: Studies in Honour of Israel Adler
50
Publisher: 
The Magnes Press, The Hebrew University
Material Type: 
Books
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem
Year: 
2002
Series: 
Yuval - Studies of the Jewish Music Research Center
Volume: 
7
Languages: 
English
French
Georgian
Greek
Attachments: 

Table of contents

Title:
Italian Jewish Musical Traditions from the Leo Levi Collection (1954-1961)
20
Publisher: 
Jewish Music Research Centre and the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, Roma
Material Type: 
Recordings
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem, Rome
Year: 
2001
Place of Recording: 
Rome
Edition: 
1
Series: 
Anthology of Music Traditions in Israel
Volume: 
14
Pages: 
1 CD + booklet
Recording Number: 
AMTI CD 0102
Type of Recording: 
Research Recording
Media: 
CD
Languages: 
English
Greek
Country / Area: 
Italy
Description: 

1 CD, accompanied by Hebrew and English program notes and texts. Selections of liturgical music of various Jewish communities in Italy, recorded originally by the Italian Jewish ethnomusicologist Leo Levi (1912-1982) from original sources. Contents: prayers, cantillation and hymns for Sabbath, High holidays, festivals, Hannukah, Purim; Songs and hymns for Birth, circumcision and wedding.

You can listen to the album on Spotify

 

Collector
Maoz Tzur

The track opens with the blessing recited upon lighting the Hanukkah candles followed by the hymn commemorating the reestablishment of Jewish worship in the Jerusalem Temple by the Maccabeans. The 'Ma'oz tzur' melody from the Verona Ashkenazi ritual is a variant of the tune transcribed by Benedetto Marcello. Other variants collected by Levi in Ferrara Gorizia Casale Monferrato and Turin attest to its longevity among the Italian Ashkenazi communities and its popularity among Italian communities in Piedmont.

Betzet Israel

This Melody for Psalm 114 celebrating the Exodus is a revealing example of the "Pan-Italian repertoire." Sung during the Passover services in the Italian rites of Ferrara (as documented here) and Rome it also appears in the Sephardi repertoires of Livorno and Venice as a "melodic marker" of this holiday.

Lekha Dodi (Turin)

Hymn by Shelomo Alkabetz (c. 1505-1584) for the "Welcoming the Sabbath" before the Friday Evening Service. This Torinese version is still sung today with the congeration repeating the second part of each stanza as a refrain.

Tradition: 
Italian
Title:
Judeo-Spanish Moroccan Songs for the Life Cycle
20
Publisher: 
Jewish Music Research Centre, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Material Type: 
Recordings
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem
Year: 
2001
Place of Recording: 
Morocco
Edition: 
2
Series: 
Anthology of Music Traditions in Israel
Volume: 
5
Pages: 
1 CD
Recording Number: 
AMTI CD 0101
Type of Recording: 
Research Recording
Media: 
CD
Languages: 
English
Greek
Kyrgyz
Country / Area: 
Morocco
Description: 

A collection of life-cycle songs: birth, circumcision, wedding etc., sung in Ladino. All songs were recorded, transcribed and annotated by Susana Weich-Shahak. The CD accompanies a book of the same title, by the above editor (Yuval Music Series, vol. 1, 1989). 1st edition (1989) was published as a cassette.

Performers: Alicia Bendayan, Ester Davida, Ginette Benabu, Jaky Benabu, Menashe Elbaz, Simi Suissa, Rahma Lucasi, Fortuna Mesas, Elvira Alfasi, Rachel Levy, Itzhak Ben Ezra, Floria Bengio.

The book Judeo-Spanish Moroccan Songs for the Life Cycle.

You can listen to this album on Spotify, download MP3s at Amazon, or find it on Apple Music. 

Tradition: 
Sephardi
Title:
The Klezmer Tradition in the Land of Israel
40
Publisher: 
Jewish Music Research Centre, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Material Type: 
Scores
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem
Year: 
2000
Place of Recording: 
Israel
Series: 
Yuval Music Series
Volume: 
6
Languages: 
English
Greek
Welsh
Country / Area: 
Israel
Description: 

This publication presents the klezmer repertoire that developed in Israel, especially in the 20th century. It treats the history of the local klezmer tradition, discusses the stylistic characteristics and genres of this music in the past and in the present and clarifies the relations between the Israeli klezmer tradition and its European and American counterparts. Examined also are the links with musical traditions of the Middle East, the cultural milieu in which the unique klezmer tradition of Israel took shape. The musical transcriptions in this book are based on field recordings of Moshe (Musa) Berlin, the senior traditional klezmer active in Israel, and of Avraham Segal, the last klezmer of the pre-State generations (and Musa's non-official teacher), spanning over three decades. Accompanied by a CD (Anthology of Music Traditions in Israel, vol. 11), catalogued separately.

Attachments: 
Author
Tradition: 
Eastern Ashkenazi
Title:
Hobn Mir a Nigndl: We Have a Little Tune
25
Publisher: 
Jewish Music Research Center, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Material Type: 
Scores
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem
Year: 
2000
Series: 
Yuval Music Series
Volume: 
7
Pages: 
180
Languages: 
English
Greek
Welsh
Country / Area: 
Poland
Description: 

The Jewish “troubadours” were wandering musicians active between the two World Wars in Eastern European Jewish centers. This collection presents the songs of the Polish "troubadour" Nokhem Shternheim that were preserved in broadsides published in Poland during his life time. These songs, arranged mostly with keyboard accompaniment, reflect the concerns and the ideological trends current among urban Eastern European Jews during a critical period of their history. The studies accompanying the songs deal with the life of the composer, genres of Yiddish poetry and issues of musical style. 33 songs.

Attachments: 
Author
Tradition: 
Eastern Ashkenazi
Title:
The Music of the Mountain Jews
25
Publisher: 
Jewish Music Research Centre, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Material Type: 
Scores
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem
Year: 
1999
Series: 
Yuval Music Series
Volume: 
5
Pages: 
167 + 43 (Hebrew intro)
Languages: 
English
Greek
Italian
Country / Area: 
Central Asia
Description: 

A study of the liturgical and folk music of one of the most remote Jewish communities, the Jews from Daghestan and neighboring areas of eastern Caucasus. This study is based on field recordings carried out during the Soviet period in the Caucasus and among immigrants from that area in Israel, as well as older recordings from Radio Makhachkala. The book includes musical transcriptions and full texts of a selection of prayers in Hebrew and folksongs in Juhuri (Judeo-Tat, the language of the Mountain Jews) from the vast ethnographic and ethnomusicological research on the Mountain Jews carried by the JMRC. Accompanied by a CD, catalogued separately (Anthology of Music Traditions in Israel, vol 10).

Attachments: 
Tradition: 
Eastern Communities
Title:
Nights in Canaan: Early Songs of the Land of Israel (1881-1946)
20
Publisher: 
Jewish Music Research Centre, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Material Type: 
Recordings
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem
Year: 
1999
Place of Recording: 
Israel (various locations)
Edition: 
1
Series: 
Anthology of Music Traditions in Israel
Volume: 
13
Pages: 
1 CD
Recording Number: 
AMTI CD 9804
Type of Recording: 
Research Recording
Media: 
CD
Languages: 
English
Greek
Country / Area: 
Israel
Description: 

A collection of songs from the period of 1882-1946, sung in Canaan - Palestine - Land of Israel. Sung in Hebrew, Yiddish and Arabic by various performers. Collected and annotated by Yaakov Mazor. Program notes in Hebrew.

 

Performers: Yirmiyahu Rosenzweig, Bat-Ami Zemiri, Shimon Felman, Ra'ya Rotem, Miryam Levitin, Ezra Kadduri, Rami Bar-Giora, Carmeliyya Sela, Professor Menashe Har-El, Moshe Kedem. 

You can listen to this album on Spotify, download MP3s at Amazon, or find it on Apple Music. 

Editor
Gilu ha-Galilim (Rejoice Galileans)

A second Aliya (1904-1914) song which became an integral part of the historical repertoire of Hebrew song. Both native-born and newly arrived pioneers sang it in all possible circumstances: at home at school in the youth movement in mass rallies and so on. The refrain alone but with the entire melody was used as accompaniment for the Hora. Almost simultaneously a variant appropriate to both the "Maccabee" movement and the Hanukah festival came into being: 'Rejoice heroic Maccabeans...' In the present version the song is performed antiphonally. The melody judging by its style may be a Hasidic dance tune. At any rate the melody of the refrain is based on motives that make up the first section of two Hasidic dance tunes one of which belongs to the repertoire of the Zanz Hasidim. The song has been published in song-books with two additional verses.

Tradition: 
Israeli
Title:
The Klezmer Tradition in the Land of Israel
20
Publisher: 
Jewish Music Research Centre, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Material Type: 
Recordings
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem
Year: 
1998
Edition: 
1
Series: 
Anthology of Music Traditions in Israel
Volume: 
11
Pages: 
1 CD
Recording Number: 
AMTI CD 9802
Type of Recording: 
Research Recording
Media: 
CD
Languages: 
English
Greek
Country / Area: 
Israel
Description: 

A collection of field recordings, mainly klezmer musical pieces, performed in Israel and representing the tradition developed in the Land of Israel since the 19th century.
An accompanying disc to the book of the same name and author, catalogued separately (Yuval Music Series, vol. 6).

You can listen to this album on Spotify, download MP3s at Amazon, or find it on Apple Music.

Attachments: 

The Klezmer Tradition in the Land of Israel, by Yaakov Mazor (Yuval Music Series, No. 6) - Book cover

Editor
Berl's Niggun

Track 4: originally a vocal dance Niggun named after Rabbi Berl Silberman of Safed (1909-1957) who used to sing it in Hallel and dance to it in Meron on Lag Ba'Omer. Performed here by Musa Berlin and an anonymous musician clarinets and Elyashiv Berlin drums. Recorded in Meron on Lag Ba'Omer 1986 by Yaakov Mazor.

Niggun Meron

Track 14: two Meron Niggunim "Ya zen" - whose first part is based on a popular Turkish-Arab love song and "Alstein Niggun" which belongs to the repertory of old Meron tunes named after Abraham Alstein a merchant from Beyrut who came regularly to Meron and used to dance to this Niggun. Recorded by Yaakov Mazor and Andre Hajdu on Lag Ba'Omer 1969 in Meron. Performers: Avraham Segal clarinet; anonymous drum.

Tradition: 
Eastern Ashkenazi
Title:
Ottoman Hebrew Sacred Songs
20
Publisher: 
Jewish Music Research Centre, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Material Type: 
Recordings
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem
Year: 
1998
Edition: 
1
Series: 
Anthology of Music Traditions in Israel
Volume: 
12
Pages: 
1 CD
Recording Number: 
AMTI CD 9803
Type of Recording: 
Research Recording
Media: 
CD
Languages: 
English
Greek
Country / Area: 
Turkey
Description: 

This rare recording of one of the last surviving singers of the Maftirim choir (Edirne, Turkey), Samuel Benaroya, documents a mostly unrecorded tradition dating from the 17th century of Hebrew & sacred poems set to Ottoman classic music. Recorded by Moshe Kirschbaum, annotated by Edwin Seroussi.

You can listen to this album on Spotify, download MP3s at Amazon, or find it on Apple Music.

Makam sehnaz- Ye'erav leka adonay elohenu (pesrev)

The vocal 'pesrev' are a unique Hebrew genre in which the performer has to exhibit outstanding vocal skills and memory for the performance of very long originally instrumental pieces.

Makam segah- Yah qados yosev tehillot (beste)

Written by Israel Najara and composed by Yusuf Pasa. The 'beste' is characterized in its Turkish form by sections with non-sense syllables which the Jewish poets tried to fill with Hebrew words.

Tradition: 
Eastern Sephardi
Title:
The Music of the Mountain Jews
20
Publisher: 
The Jewish Music Research Centre, The Hebrew Univ
Material Type: 
Recordings
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem
Year: 
1998
Series: 
Anthology of Music Traditions in Israel
Volume: 
10
Pages: 
1 CD
Recording Number: 
AMTI CD 9801
Type of Recording: 
Research Recording
Media: 
CD
Languages: 
English
Greek
Italian
Country / Area: 
Central Asia
Description: 

A study of the liturgical and folk music of one of the most remote Jewish communities, the Jews from Daghestan and neighboring areas of eastern Caucasus. This study is based on field recordings carried out during the Soviet period in the Caucasus and among immigrants from that area in Israel, as well as older recordings from Radio Makhachkala. The CD includes musical exemples of prayers in Hebrew and folksongs in Juhuri (Judeo-Tat, the language of the Mountain Jews) from the vast ethnographic and ethnomusicological research on the Mountain Jews carried by the JMRC. Accompanied by a book with texts and transcriptions, catalogued separately.

You can listen to this album on Spotify, download MP3s at Amazon, or find it on Apple Music. 

Khars

The Khars performed by the Orchestra of the National Daghestan Company ("Lezginka") is a dance tune characteristic of the Mountain Jews. Tankhoi Izrailov the director of Lezginka heard this song from his grandmother in the city of Kuba and adopted it for this dance company. The Khars (lit. "to clap the hands" in Juhuri) is very similar to Ovshori in its form and rhythm but much slower in tempo.

Iyr

The Iyr also known in Juhuri as Uylov or Uylomish and in the Kabardin dialect as Ghiyr or Ghibzi is a genre found among all Turkish peoples but among the Jews appears only in the Khaytoghi tradition. These are long complex compositions usually consisting of three parts. The opening is a free polyphonic introductory section in very slow tempo based on motifs from well-known songs. It is followed by a short part which alludes to rhythms from the upcoming sections. The music then abruptly returns to the free rhythm improvisation of the opening section. The third part consists of several melodies each in a tempo faster than the previous one ending with a number of Lezginka dances.

Tradition: 
Eastern Communities

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