JMRC Store

כותרת:
Judeo-Caribbean Currents: Music of the Mikvé Israel-Emanuel Synagogue in Curaçao
20
Publisher: 
Jewish Music Research Centre, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Material Type: 
Recordings
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem, Israel
Year: 
2009
Place of Recording: 
Montreal,Canada and Jerusalem, Israel
Edition: 
1
Series: 
Anthology of Music Traditions in Israel
Volume: 
22
Pages: 
1 CD + Booklet
Recording Number: 
AMTI 0901
Media: 
CD
Languages: 
English
Hebrew
Description: 
Dramatic demographic and ideological shifts characterize the three and a half century saga of the small and yet prominent United Netherlands-Portuguese Congregation Mikvé Israel-Emanuel in Curaçao. Its liturgical music is a reflection of the rich historical path followed by this unique Sephardic community in the Caribbean. Interpreting the multifaceted repertoire that emerges from the selections in this CD entails the description of some key events in the history of this community. In telling this story, several conflicting memories converge into a multilayered musical narrative.
 
The small but prominent Jewish community of Curaçao had a notorious role in the musical affairs of the island. The two “Portuguese” synagogues of Curaçao were a focus for musical activities with many of the most distinguished local musicians, Jewish and non-Jewish, serving as performers and providing new compositions.
 
The manuscripts in the archive of the Curaçao synagogue include music for the entire liturgical order of Sabbaths and most especially for the High Holidays. They cover almost a century and a half of activities in both Mikvé Israel and Emanuel before and after the reunification of 1964. A majority of these sources consist of original settings by the local composers, as well as materials drawn from diverse Western European and American sources, attesting to the major impact that the process of modernization had on the music of the two nominally Portuguese synagogues on the island. We say nominally because few items from the Portuguese Jewish music tradition were preserved in the manuscripts. 
 
The fragmentary character of the sources limited the selection to pieces that could be reconstructed in a reasonable manner. For practical purposes, it was decided to rearrange all the pieces, originally meant for cantor, various soloists, choir and organ, for voice and piano. Some pieces are reproduced literally in accordance to the original, but judicious editing and arranging was applied to others.

 

Performers:
Gideon Y. Zelermyer (hazzan) and Raymond Goldstein (piano)
Vocal ensemble: Naama Nazarathy (soprano), Shelly Berlinsky (alto), Evan Cohen (tenor), Jay Shir (bass)
Commentaries by Edwin Seroussi

Includes: 
1 book + 1 cd
En kelohenu (Pavel Slavensky)

Composed by Pavel Slavensky who was born in 1909 as Pinchos Yaakov Freilich in Czechoslovakia. He was one of six children of a hassid from the Belzer court. After WWII, he served at various congregations in the USA, became the first permanent cantor of the Adat Shalom Synagogue in Northwest Detroit where he served until 1949 when he moved to Temple Sholem on Lake Shore Drive, Chicago. He was in Curaçao from 1971 to 1975 and edited a selection of transliterations of responses and hymns of the Sabbath service. One piece attributed to him, En kelohenu, was found in the archive.

Lekha dodi
Taken from one of the major anthologies of Curaçao’s Jewish liturgical music that was edited and annotated by Cantor Norman Swerling. In it appear a few Portuguese melodies that have not been traced back to the community’s musical archive but appeared in Swerling’s collection and were adopted by him from extant published anthologies in an attempt to perpetuate the Portuguese component of the liturgy as demanded from him by the Directiva of the congregation. A most apparent example is Lecha Dodi, which is almost identical to the one included in the important anthology of Hazzan David Aharon de Sola from Amsterdam and London.
כותרת:
Kulmus Hanefesh: A Musical Journey into the Hassidic Niggun
20
Publisher: 
Jewish Music Research Centre, Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Jerusalem Music Center
Material Type: 
Recordings
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem, Israel
Year: 
2009
Place of Recording: 
Jerusalem, Israel
Edition: 
1
Series: 
Contemporary Jewish Music
Volume: 
1
Pages: 
1 CD + Booklet
Media: 
CD
Languages: 
English
Hebrew
Country / Area: 
Israel
Description: 
Dance Niggun

This niggun of instrumental nature originater in the Bukovina region today located in the Ukraine. Yair Harel's Middle Eastern style of drumming and singing forms a natural bridge linking what would seem to be two contrasting styles which commonly come together in Klezmer music originating in the Balkans.

Sweet Hymns Shall Be My Chant.

This sacred hymn attributed to Rabbi Yehuda he-Hasid (d.1217) is sung in Ashkenazi synagogues at the end of the Sabbath and holiday morning services and it customary to open the Holy Ark while singing this poem.

Tradition: 
Eastern Ashkenazi
כותרת:
Judeo-Caribbean Currents: Music of the Mikvé Israel-Emanuel Synagogue in Curaçao
20
Publisher: 
Jewish Music Research Centre, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Material Type: 
Scores
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem, Israel
Year: 
2009
Edition: 
1
Series: 
Yuval Music Series
Volume: 
8
Pages: 
82
Languages: 
English
Hebrew
Attachments: 
Arrangement
Tradition: 
Spanish-Portuguese
כותרת:
An Early Twentieth-Century Sephardi Troubadour: The Historical Recordings of Haim Effendi of Turkey
40
Publisher: 
Jewish Music Research Centre, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Material Type: 
Recordings
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem, Israel
Year: 
2008
Place of Recording: 
Turkey
Edition: 
1
Series: 
Anthology of Music Traditions in Israel
Volume: 
21
Pages: 
4 CDs + booklet
Recording Number: 
AMTI 0801
Media: 
CD
Languages: 
English
Hebrew
Description: 

This production features recordings by early 20th century Turkish cantor Haim Effendi. He was first recorded in 1907 by Odeon Records in Turkey who released his first 78 rpm records. This recording vies for the honor of being the first commercial Sephardi recording. This and other very early releases signaled the beginning of an era in Sephardi music that for all practical purposes continues to this very day. As Isaac Algazi of Izmir did shortly after him, Haim recorded liturgical pieces for diverse occasions (especially for the High Holidays) and songs in Ladino, amid other recordings in Turkish that are not represented in the present production. His repertoire, a cross-cut of what producers of the recording companies and the recording artist himself considered “recordable”, provides a fair picture of the state of Sephardi music in the large urban centers of the Ottoman Empire ca. 1890-1918.

Click to see Updates to the booklet of the CD (January 2010).

You can listen to this album on Spotify, download MP3s at Amazon, or find it on Apple Music. 

Qiddush_(kidousche)

A classical Eastern Sephardi rendition of the Sabbath Eve Qiddush (the Sanctification of the Sabbath over a cup of wine) recited by the head of the family before the festive meal. The text includes introductory verses (Genesis 2:1-3) the blessing over the wine and the blessing of the Sabbath. The piece ends with a vocalization and Haim Effendi’s blessing “Shabbat shalom siñores” (“A peaceful Sabbath my friends”).

Las_horas_de_la_vida

One of the most widespread and frequently recorded Sephardi songs throughout the 20th century. The version by Haim is the oldest one on record and one of the most complete in existence. Originating in an Andalusian folksong the present version incorporates stanzas from other popular Spanish songs. It is plausible that Haim Effendi played a crucial role in the composition and dissemination of this most famous modern Sephardi song which he may have heard from Spanish artists touring the Ottoman Empire (Seroussi in press 1).

Tradition: 
Sephardi
כותרת:
A Song of Dawn
50
Publisher: 
Jewish Music Research Centre, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Material Type: 
Recordings
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem, Israel
Year: 
2007
Place of Recording: 
Israel
Edition: 
1
Series: 
Anthology of Music Traditions in Israel
Volume: 
20
Pages: 
6 CDs + booklet
Recording Number: 
AMTI 0701
Type of Recording: 
Research Recording
Media: 
CD
Languages: 
English
Hebrew
Country / Area: 
Israel
Description: 

The new 6 CD set of the series “Anthology of Musical Traditions in Israel”, “The Jerusalem Sephardi Baqqashot at the Har Tzyion Synagogue”, originated in a comprehensive study of the liturgical music of the “Jerusalem-Sephardi” tradition which Dr. Essica Marks has been conducting since 2001, under the auspices of the Jewish Music Research Centre and with the support of the Israel Science Foundation. Unlike the other disks produced up to now in the series, the present project is not based on existing archival recordings, but on a comprehensive series of recordings made in the Har Tzyion synagogue in the Old City of Jerusalem in 2003 specifically for the production of this series.

While the “Jerusalem-Sephardi” Baqqashot, a branch of the Jewish tradition from Aleppo (Syria), has attracted considerable attention from researchers in Israel and the USA since the beginning of the 20th century, the number of commercial recordings from this rich musical lore is scant. In the 1980s cassettes of this repertoire were published by Renanot – The Institute of Jewish Music in Jerusalem and by the Sephardic Archives of the Syrian Jewish Community in Brooklyn. However, the present recordings offer an ethnographical dimension and quality that were missing in previous releases.

The veteran cantor Abraham Caspi, a master of the Jerusalem Sephardi tradition, directed the recording process meticulously. Although the Jerusalem Sephardi Baqqashot are today performed in various synagogues in Israel, and even beyond its borders, it is generally accepted that the performance of Abraham Caspi and the Har Tzyion congregation is one of the most authentic expressions of this colorful musical event that has been performed in Jerusalem over the past hundred and fifty years. The Jewish Music Research Centre extends heart-felt thanks to him, and to his congregation, without whose agreement and enthusiastic participation this important enterprise would never have been accomplished.

You can listen to this album on Spotify, download MP3s at Amazon, or find it on Apple Music.

Ani ashava' ba-boker (I shall cry out in the morning)

Author: Joseph Siton. The 'lahan' consists of four musical units (a-a-b-a) corresponding to the four verses of each of the eight strophes.

Male pi shira (My mouth is full of song)

Author: Meir. The 'lahan' is divided into three sections. The first is sung by the congregation the second and third constitute an antiphonal structure sung by solo singer and congregation. There is a modal transition between the sections: the first is based on the Ajam 'maqam' the second on Saba and the third on Jaharqa. Melodic structure: first section a-b-a-b (verses 1 2 3 4); second section c-c'-d (verse 5); third section e-e'-e'-h (verse 6 [7]).

Tradition: 
Sephardi
כותרת:
With Songs They Respond: The Diwan of the Jews from Central Yemen
30
Publisher: 
Jewish Music Research Centre, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Material Type: 
Recordings
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem, Israel
Year: 
2006
Series: 
Anthology of Music Traditions in Israel
Volume: 
19
Pages: 
2 CDs + booklet (186 pp.)
Media: 
CD
Languages: 
English
Hebrew
Description: 

The Jews of Yemen possess rich musical traditions, which have always been of interest to scholars of Jewish music, just as their unique cultural history has attracted the attention of Jewish scholars from an early stage. Interest in this culture is still alive today, half a century after the migration of most of the Jews from Yemen to Israel. Their special contribution to the development of Israeli culture, including many variants of Israeli music, is one focus of such interest. This publication of archival recordings of Yemenite Jewish music is still, therefore, considerably pertinent.

This album contains a selection from the varied range of recordings made by Naomi Bahat-Ratzon and Avner Bahat in the 1970s. They have been chosen in the first place on the grounds of the quality of performance and recording, and, secondly, in accordance with the diverse principles and combinations characteristic of the diwan repertoire. Some of the songs are heard in a series of different performances, in order to enable the listener to appreciate the variety of melodies and their combinations, while focusing on the basic characteristics of the music of the diwan songs. Each singer chose the stanzas that he wanted to sing, as well as the melodies and the transitions between them. This enables one to comprehend the ways in which the songs have evolved in the Yemenite Jewish tradition and in their Israeli adaptations.

 

Performers include: Zadok Zubeiri, Shalom Keisar, Uri Cohen, Menachem Arussi, Yosef Ozeiri, Yosef Cohen, Yehudah Cohen, Zekhariah Yitzhak, Aharon Cohen, Haim Cohen, Danny Cohen, Baruch Yefet, Aharon Amram, Yehiel Zabari, and Haim Ozeiri.

You can listen to this album on Spotify, download MP3s at Amazon, or find it on Apple Music.

Im nin’alu daltei nedivim

Im nin’alu daltei nedivim is a shira by Shalem Shabazi, signed Alshabazi. This poem is one of the most popular and widely known among the Yemenite Jews. It is sung on many different occasions, at weddings and other celebrations, to many melodies. Alternate stanzas are written in Hebrew and Arabic.

This recording features Shalom Keisar , accompanying himself on a drum, with the Kiryat Ono male voice ensemble, sing the first and last stanzas accompanied by hand clapping. The singer opens with the song’s most widely known melody, which was popularized by Bracha Zefira among the Jewish community of Palestine. It is sung in a responsorial manner: the soloist sings the opening hemistich and the choir the closing hemistich. The tawshihִ is sung to another, faster melody. It is usually sung in a responsorial manner, as follows: the soloist sings the first verse, and the choir the second, the soloist sings the second verse and the choir the third. At the end of the song the singers sing a third, slower melody, and a coda-like passage, and then repeat the last two verses at a faster tempo, followed by the blessing Vekulkhem berukhim (You all are blessed).

כותרת:
Oh, Lovely Parrot! - Jewish Women's Songs from Kerala
20
Publisher: 
The Jewish Music Research Centre, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Material Type: 
Recordings
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem
Year: 
2004
Place of Recording: 
Israel, Cochin
Edition: 
1
Series: 
Anthology of Music Traditions in Israel
Volume: 
18
Pages: 
1 CD + Booklet
Recording Number: 
AMTI 0403
Type of Recording: 
Research Recording
Media: 
CD
Languages: 
English
Hebrew
Malayalam
Country / Area: 
India
Description: 

For centuries, the Jewish women of Cochin have been singing Jewish songs in the Malayalam language of Kerala, their ancient homeland on the tropical southwest coast of India. The 42 songs on this CD represent just a fraction of their traditional repertoire as preserved in more than 300 written texts, though the melodies of most of the songs have been forgotten. Until recently, the performance of these songs was in danger of being lost altogether with the immigration of almost all the Cochin Jews to Israel, where younger generations no longer understand Malayalam. Fortunately, a collaborative project is now under way, with a team of international scholars, studying and translating the songs, and a group of Cochin women dedicated to reviving their performance. This CD is one result of this collaboration.

 

Performers: Simcha Yosef, Hannah Yitzhak, Rahel Kala, Venus Lane, Sarah Cohen, Ruby S. Hallegua, Rahel Nehemia, Toba Sofer, Miriam Daniel, Leah E. Eliavoo, Rivka Yehoshua, Galia Hacco.

You can listen to this album on Spotify, download MP3s at Amazon, or find it on Apple Music. 

Blessing Song

A song of blessing for many occasions especially for the bridegroom for an infant boy before brit milah (circumcision)and for the pidyon ha-ben (ritual for redeeming a first-born son). Variants are found in nineteen different notebooks indicating the song's popularity and making is difficult to decipher its meaning. The text refers specifically to childbrith and it echoes a number of the morning blessing in the Hebrew liturgy.

Enni enni tirttu dinam (The fifth of Iyyar)

A Malayalam Zionist song celebrating the declaration of Israeli independence on the fifth day of the Hebrew month of Iyyar May 14 1948 when the British rulers departed from Palestine at the end of the Mandate. It praises the Jewish youth who "took up" the independence which was handed over by "the brutal Englishmen." Set to a popular cinema tune of the say "Enni enni parkum manam" from the Tamil film "Valukayi" ("Life") composed by R. Sudarsanam. It was performed during yearly Independence Day celebrations in Chendamangalam in the early 1950s. The first verse is repeated as a chorus.

Muyimpya Tampirnte (When Moses Received knowledge)

This Kerala "play song" for Shavuot is about Mutaliyār Moses receiving the Torah on Mount Sinai and dropping the tablets because they became too heavy. It alludes to a midrash about how the letters flew off the tablets of the Law when Moses came down the mountain and beheld the worship of the golden calf. Mutaliyār is a title given to the leaders of various communities in Kerala.

Tradition: 
Cochin
כותרת:
The Hasidic Niggun as Sung by the Hasidim
30
Publisher: 
The Jewish Music Research Centre, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Material Type: 
Recordings
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem
Year: 
2004
Edition: 
1
Series: 
Anthology of Music Traditions in Israel
Volume: 
17
Pages: 
2 CDs + booklet (150 pp.)
Recording Number: 
AMTI 0402
Type of Recording: 
Research Recording
Media: 
CD
Languages: 
English
Hebrew
Yiddish
Country / Area: 
Israel
Description: 

Contains Niggunim of various genres, and from various Hassidic dynasties, performed either in solo or group singing (choir or congregation), occasionally with instrumental accompaniment. The Niggunim are taken from a variety of calendar and life-cycle events: Shabbat, Festivals, Zemirot, Tish, Wedding, Dance, Devequt, Marches, Waltzes, etc.
Most of the tracks were recorded in Jerusalem and Benei Berak, others in Kefar Habbad, Rehovot, and one in the US.
All Niggunim have been selected from recordings, made since 1961, which are preserved in the collection of the National Sound Archive (NSA) of the Jewish National and Universitary Library, Jerusalem.
Alongside some Pan-Hassidic Niggunim, this compilation represents the following Hassidic communities: Lubavich, Vizhnitz, Karlin (main part of the corpus); Bobov, Boyan, Slonim, Spinka, Sanz, Kretshniff, Toledot Aharon (fair number of recordings); Amshinov, Biale, Gur, Wurke, Lelov, Modzhitz, Porisov, Shomerei Emunim and others (few examples).

You can listen to this album on Spotify, or order it on Amazon.

Editor
"Ki hinneh kahomer"

A 'niggun' of the lubavich Hasidim by Shalom Kharitonov (1886-1933) of Nikolayev Ukraine. Shalom and his brother Aharon among the leading Lubavich 'menagnim' and composers were active under the Rebbes R. Shalom Ber and his son R. Yosef at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries (Zalmanoff vol. I no. 66 and "Index of 'niggunim'" p. li-iii lv lviii). The 'niggun' was composed in the pattern of the Hasisdic Waltz 'niggun' with the Classical structure A-B-C-B. It was originally sung without words but in Israel Lubavich 'ba'alei-teffilah' sing it to the words of the 'piyyut' "Ki hinneh ka-homer" on the eve of the Day of Atonement. This practice has also been adopted in Israel by National-Religious circles. The melody also became popular during the 1920s among non-religious circles in the Land of Israel when Immanuel Ha-Russi wrote words for it- a lullaby entitled "Shekhav beni shekhav bi-mnuhah" (Aldema-Shahar vol. II p. 70). In this recording only the first two stanzas are sung.

"Shir la-ma'alot essa 'einai"

A 'niggun' for Psalm 121 composed by R. Ben-Zion Halberstam of Bobov (1873-1941). According to various reports it was sung by Bobov Hasidim at Joyful and other events; Kloyzenberg Hasidim sang it at wedding events. The 'niggun' has a tripartite structure: waltz - slow part - march. Each part consists of sections or phrases corresponding to the verses of the psalm. The waltz (verses 1-3) has three sections. The slow part (verses 4-6) ends with an open cadence and it too has three sections: the first continues in the waltz rhythm at a slightly slower tempo; the second is in recitative style; and the third resembles a slow waltz. The third part (verses 7-8) in march rhythm consists of two phrases the second of which ends in a surprising modulation.

Tradition: 
Eastern Ashkenazi
כותרת:
The Western Sephardi Liturgical Tradition
20
Publisher: 
Jewish Music Research Centre, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Material Type: 
Recordings
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem
Year: 
2004
Place of Recording: 
New York
Edition: 
1
Series: 
Anthology of Music Traditions in Israel
Volume: 
16
Pages: 
1 CD + booklet
Recording Number: 
AMTI 0401
Type of Recording: 
Research Recording
Media: 
CD
Languages: 
English
Hebrew
Country / Area: 
USA
Description: 

The Western Sephardi Liturgical Tradition as Sung by Abraham Lopes Cardozo. Originally from the Portuguese Jewish community in Amsterdam, serving the Portuguese community of Suriname and then more than 40 years as Hazzan of the Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue of New York City, Cardozo is considered one of the last living Hazzanim of the venerable Western Sephardi tradition. This CD combines recordings carried out over a span of almost 50 years, and attempts to sample the various layers of the liturgy: recitation formulae for various occasions (Shabbat, Festivals, Circumcision and Wedding), cantillation (reading from the Scriptures), and melodies for the High Holidays and Qinnot (dirges).

You can listen to this album on Spotify, download MP3s at Amazon, or find it on Apple Music.

Attachments: 
Cover Image
Table of Contents
Yom Hashishi

The complete Portuguese version of the Sabbath Eve Qiddus (the Sanctification of the Sabbath over a cup of wine) recited by the head of the family before the ritual hand washing that precedes the festive meal. The musical technique employed in this rendition is similar to the scriptural reading of Biblical texts. The introductory verses are chanted in a psalmodic manner in minor. At the benediction over the wine the piece switches to major and remains so for the benediction of the Sabbath.

Sheva Berakhot

The Sheva' berakhot ("Seven Blessings") are a central component of the Jewish wedding ceremony. This recording is a unique rendition of this prayer that comprises the closing section of the wedding ceremony that takes place under the huppah (wedding canopy). The performance consists of a recitation formula similar to that of other benedictions. This formula consists of two parts as do most Jewish liturgical blessings. Since the benedictions have very diverse textual lengths from very short to very long the melody is prolonged by additional motives. The first part covering the opening text of the blessing varies with each repetition depending on the length of the text of each blessing. The second part comprising the blessing formula itself (starting with the words Barukh ata "Blessed by you") is similar in all the repetitions. The benedictions end here with the formula Hodu ladonay ki tov ki le'olam hasdo tanosna anabot mi-ysrael vetirbena semahot ("Let us thank the Lord for His kindness for His mercy is forever let the suffering disappear from Israel and joyful occasions proliferate").

Tradition: 
Spanish-Portuguese
כותרת:
The Lachmann Problem: An Unsung Chapter in Comparative Musicology
35
Publisher: 
The Hebrew University Magnes Press
Material Type: 
Books
Place of Publication: 
Jerusalem
Year: 
2003
Edition: 
1
Series: 
Yuval Monograph Series
Volume: 
12
Languages: 
English
Description: 

Includes unpublished letters and lectures of Robert Lachmann. Accompanied by one CD with musical examples from Lachmann radio talks (1936-7).

Author

AddToAny